Introduction to Linux Cluster Filesystems

oracle_use.jpg Cluster filesystems complement the database cluster facilities in Oracle RAC in various ways. Here's how theycompare. Traditionally, a cluster is simply a group of servers, either PCs or workstations, acting as a single system. That definition is stretching considerably, however; cluster technology is now a dynamic field with diverse applications that is continually absorbing new features. Furthermore, cluster filesystem technologies, whether open source or proprietary, are rapidly converging in their capabilities. Many people refer to cluster applications and the filesystem software used in them as if they were one and the same. More accurately, most clusters have two main components: servers, which are connected to some sort of shared storage media through a fast network, and filesystems, which act as the software "glue" that keeps the cluster nodes working together.

Scritto da ubuntulandnireblog, il 22-09-2008
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Programming Tools and Utilities, provided a high-level view of Linux programming

linux62.jpg Using the GCC compiler Automating builds with make The preceding post, “Programming Environments and Interfaces,” provided a high-level view of Linux programming, focusing on the overall development environment and introducing the idioms that give programming on a Linux system its distinctive character. This chapter goes into greater detail and describes some of the tools and toys found on a typical Linux development system. Examining library utilities Exploring source code control The goal of this chapter is not to turn you into a developer in 30 pages or less, but simply to explore some of the variety of tools developers use so you will at least know what they are and what they do. You’ll also learn how to use some of the programs and utilities. Debugging with GDB

Managing Background and Foreground Processes

linux_logo.gif If you are using Linux over a network or from a dumb terminal (a monitor that allows only text input with no GUI support), your shell may be all that you have. You may be used to a windowing environment where you have a lot of programs active at the same time so that you can switch among them as needed. This shell thing can seem pretty limited. Although the bash shell doesn’t include a GUI for running many programs, it does let you move active programs between the background and foreground. In this way, you can have a lot of stuff running, while selectively choosing the one you want to deal with at the moment. There are several ways to place an active program in the background. One mentioned earlier is to add an ampersand (&) to the end of a command line. Another way is to use the at command to run commands in a way in which they are not connected to the shell.

Scritto da ubuntulandpage, il 20-09-2008
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The Linux file system is organized as a hierarchy of directories.

pingouin-linux.jpg Linux File Systems Versus Windows-Based File Systems Although similar in many ways, the Linux file system has some striking differences from file systems used in MS-DOS and Windows operating systems. There are a few: In MS-DOS and Windows file systems, drive letters represent different storage devices (for example, A: is a floppy drive and C: is a hard disk). In Linux, all storage devices are fit into the file system hierarchy. So, the fact that all of /usr may be on a separate hard disk or that /mnt/rem1 is a file system from another computer is invisible to the user.

Sequential and Backup Commands for linux

Command-Line Recall After you type a command line, that entire command line is saved in your shell’s history list. The list is stored in a history file, from which any command can be recalled to run again. After it is recalled, you can modify the command line, as described earlier. To view your histor y list, use the history command. Type the command without options or followed by a number to list that many of the most recent commands

Scritto da ubuntulandpage, il 19-09-2008
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Linux File Systems Versus Windows-Based File Systems

linux_logo.gif Although similar in many ways, the Linux file system has some striking differences from file systems used in MS-DOS and Windows operating systems. Here are a few: In MS-DOS and Windows file systems, drive letters represent different storage devices (for example, A: is a floppy drive and C: is a hard disk). In Linux, all storage devices are fit into the file system hierarchy. So, the fact that all of /usr may be on a separate hard disk or that /mnt/rem1 is a file system from another computer is invisible to the user.

Linux: Bash Configuration Files

linux_bash.png Bash Configuration Files File Description /etc/profile Sets up user environment information for every user. It is executed when you first log in. This file provides values for your path, as well as setting environment variables for such things as the location of your mailbox and the size of your history files. Finally, /etc/profile gathers shell settings from configuration files in the /etc/profile.d directory. /etc/bashrc Executes for every user who runs the bash shell, each time a bash shell is opened. It sets the default prompt and may add one or more aliases. Values in this file can be overridden by information in each user’s ~/.bashrc file.

New testing version of Gammu was just born

gammu.png Gammu is a project which encompasses applications, scripts and drivers for managing various functions on cellular phones and similiar devices. It is a stable and mature codebase with support for many models available on the market and provides functions unavailable in other similiar projects. Long term development is oriented towards making a shared API for classes of device rather than supporting single phone models (which are eventually made obsolete with the arrival of new models). This software was earlier (up to version 0.58) named MyGnokii2, current name Gammu is not connected with Gammu from "Heretics of Dune" written by Frank Herbert. We name this "main" project core too, because there are various other projects based on it available now.

GnomeCanvas: The canvas widget is a powerful and extensible object-oriented display engine

gnome canvas2.png The canvas widget is a powerful and extensible object-oriented display engine, useful in a wide variety of Gnome applications. The widget itself is simply a blank area; you can place GnomeCanvasItems on it. A GnomeCanvasItem is a GtkObject representing some element of the display, such as an image, a rectangle, an ellipse, or some text. You can refer to this architecture as structured graphics; the canvas lets you deal with graphics in terms of items, rather than an undifferentiated grid of pixels.

Introduction to the Gnome Canvas Widget

gnome canvas.png The canvas widget is a powerful and extensible object-oriented display engine, useful in a wide variety of Gnome applications. The widget itself is simply a blank area; you can place GnomeCanvasItems on it. A GnomeCanvasItem is a GtkObject representing some element of the display, such as an image, a rectangle, an ellipse, or some text. You can refer to this architecture as structured graphics; the canvas lets you deal with graphics in terms of items, rather than an undifferentiated grid of pixels.







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